Titled

I'm James the person, and what I do is write.

thegroovygatsby:

currently on our door

nossidge:


i
am
the
path
along
unseen
heather


Snowball (also called a Chaterism): A poem in which each line is a single word, and each successive word is one letter longer. One of the constrained writing techniques utilised by the Oulipo (Workshop of Potential Literature).
o
we
all
have
heard
people
believe
anything


Given the mathematical genesis of the Oulipo and the interest in the movement among other programmers, I thought that someone must have created a program to generate these, and I was surprised that I couldn’t find one even after some pretty thorough Googling. So I wrote one myself. The C++ code is here.
It takes input from a text file which contains novels from Project Gutenberg, scans for word pairs where the second word is longer by one letter, and builds up a poem using Markov chains.
i
am
the
dawn
light
before
anybody
expected
something
disorderly

The poems in this post were all created by the program. They have not been edited.
i
am
the
very
great
change

nossidge:

i
am
the
path
along
unseen
heather

Snowball (also called a Chaterism): A poem in which each line is a single word, and each successive word is one letter longer. One of the constrained writing techniques utilised by the Oulipo (Workshop of Potential Literature).

o
we
all
have
heard
people
believe
anything

Given the mathematical genesis of the Oulipo and the interest in the movement among other programmers, I thought that someone must have created a program to generate these, and I was surprised that I couldn’t find one even after some pretty thorough Googling. So I wrote one myself. The C++ code is here.

It takes input from a text file which contains novels from Project Gutenberg, scans for word pairs where the second word is longer by one letter, and builds up a poem using Markov chains.

i
am
the
dawn
light
before
anybody
expected
something
disorderly

The poems in this post were all created by the program. They have not been edited.

i
am
the
very
great
change

fishingboatproceeds:

Never forget.

OH GOD. ALWAYS FORGET.

(Source: hankgreenmustachioed)

penzyzzyva:

thegoddamazon:

I’m out.

Great.

Now I’m imagining all of Bella’s lines being spoken by Jesse Pinkman.

Suddenly, Twilight became infinitely better.

(Source: assbuttsinthetardis221b)

Nine Mile

50,991 words of pure drivel. ENJOY.

Read More

j. lesley feezberg: THE NEW TURTLE by Bobby Hendricks 

jlesleyfeezberg:

CHAPTER 1 - “THE BEGINNING”:

“OH NO” shouted Leonardo as he fell through the roof of a suburban house. He fell right at the foot of a cool bunk bed shaped like a double-decker bus. Who was in the bed? It was Bobby Kendricks, a cool middle-schooler from Des Moines.

“Where am I?” asked Leonardo…

So… this is how you do NaNoWriMo.

shin-sekai:

A delusory image. An explosion composed by a lightbulb and tons of red, orange and yellow gummy bears and worms

thedailywhat:

In Light Of Recent Events of the Day: In case you haven’t heard, this is a thing now.

thedailywhat:

In Light Of Recent Events of the Day: In case you haven’t heard, this is a thing now.

laugh-addict:

modmad:

thebohemians-rpsody:

Dublin

You see, this is what I love about Ireland.

Most people would look at that rock and say; “gosh, that’s a pretty cool rock, I wonder how it stays up like that?”

No. That is not the right way to do things.

The Irish look at that and say; “I’m going to build a house on that fucker.”

via laugh-addict 

It took me ten seconds to google this and figure out it was photoshopped. The island is in Thailand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khao_Phing_Kan) and they stole a bit of Lichtenstein Castle for the top bit. Also, it looks fake.

Lolliblog: What Next? 

lolliblog:

At my agent’s urging, I have been working on a sequel to my YA novel. The feedback from preview readers was that they were eager to know what happened next.

My initial reaction was cool! Here was validation that I’d turned out a story that ended on a note of sustained interest. That, plus sequels and trilogies seem to be the order of the day. This makes economic sense; if the primary book sells well, a guaranteed market for the second and maybe third book is created. So, I started writing.

I thought it would be easy, picking up from where I left off with characters I know well and happen to love, but truthfully, it’s been a slog. I put in my time every day, generate more pages, move the plot along. But as much as writing a sequel is doable, it feels forced, rather than organic, the way it was with the original.

The whole thing got me thinking about sequels. My favorite books have always been one-offers, stand-alones. Can you imagine Jane Eyre, My Life As Mrs. Rochester? Would Charlotte Bronte have had to brainstorm ways to prolong Jane’s travails? What if her former student, and Edward’s illegitimate daughter, Adele, returned to Thornfield Hall to drain the family fortune? How about To Kill a Mockingbird II, in which Jem and Scout are faced with the heartbreaking task of putting Atticus in a nursing home?

I think- no, I know -these books ended where they should, hopeful and uncertain. To me, they never felt like cliffhangers but an open and generous invitation for me to use my imagination.

I am beginning to think that the sequel is the marketplace talking, and that art lives in the intentionally unresolved.

Respect.

infinity-imagined:

The orbits of the moons and planets form a 4-dimensional fractal helix in spacetime.

I like this, but the scaling keeps bothering me. Why is Earth bigger than the Sun?

The sort of picture .gifs were made for.

(Source: caryjojifukunaga)

Never look at a reference book while doing a first draft. You want to write a story? Fine. Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus. Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket. The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time. Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word. There are no exceptions to this rule. You think you might have misspelled a word? O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later. Why not? Did you think it was going to go somewhere? And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland? You can check it … but later. When you sit down to write, write. Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

Stephen King  (via alexisawkward)

That’s great and true advice!  

(via michaelmidnight)

(Source: amandaonwriting)

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